5 Great Audio Biographies for Kids

Hello Scott County friends!  June is Audiobook month across the country and we are starting off the celebration with 5 great biographies for kids that are currently available in OverDrive that you can download with your library card.  There are even some stories in this list that adults will probably love as well.  We know road trips are vacations are still around the corner and we want to provide you with some great listens while you are doing things around the house or on long car rides.  Plug in those headphones with us and listen away.  As always, if you have any questions about OverDrive or Libby, don’t hesitate to contact us here on the blog (readingadvised@gmail.com)  or by phone at 812-752-2751.  We will be glad to help offer suggestions!

Lives of the Presidents

Kathleen Krull & John C. Brown

Summary:

Every U.S. president is the focus of public scrutiny, but how well do we know these men? What kind of fathers do presidents make? Husbands? Neighbors? Other books focus on the historical achievements of those who have occupied our country’s highest office; Lives of the Presidents looks instead at their bad habits, silly nicknames, and strange pets.

Every president–from George Washington to Bill Clinton–is included, with an emphasis on those who have had the greatest impact on history. Discover their high points, low points, and the times in between. In this stunning addition to their acclaimed series, Kathleen Krull and Kathryn Hewitt take us beyond politics and photo opportunities, revealing the entertaining, complex, and very real lives of the presidents.  — Goodreads.com

Find it on OverDrive

 

 

Path to the Stars

Sylvia Acevedo

Summary:

The inspiring memoir for young readers about a Latina rocket scientist whose early life was transformed by joining the Girl Scouts and who currently serves as CEO of the Girl Scouts of the USA.

A meningitis outbreak in their underprivileged neighborhood left Sylvia Acevedo’s family forever altered. As she struggled in the aftermath of loss, young Sylvia’s life transformed when she joined the Brownies. The Girl Scouts taught her how to take control of her world and nourished her love of numbers and science.
With new confidence, Sylvia navigated shifting cultural expectations at school and at home, forging her own trail to become one of the first Latinx to graduate with a master’s in engineering from Stanford University and going on to become a rocket scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.  — Goodreads.com

Find it on OverDrive

 

 

The Disappearing Spoon

Sam Kean

Summary:

A young readers edition of the New York Times bestseller The Disappearing Spoon, chronicling the extraordinary stories behind one of the greatest scientific tools in existence: the periodic table.

Why did Gandhi hate iodine (I, 53)?

How did radium (Ra, 88) nearly ruin Marie Curie’s reputation?

And why did tellurium (Te, 52) lead to the most bizarre gold rush in history?

The periodic table is a crowning scientific achievement, but it’s also a treasure trove of adventure, greed, betrayal, and obsession. The fascinating tales in The Disappearing Spoon follow elements on the table as they play out their parts in human history, finance, mythology, conflict, the arts, medicine, and the lives of the (frequently) mad scientists who discovered them.

Adapted for a middle grade audience, the young readers edition of The Disappearing Spoon offers the material in a simple, easy-to-follow format, with approximately 20 line drawings and sidebars throughout. Students, teachers, and burgeoning science buffs will love learning about the history behind the chemistry.  — Goodreads.com

Find it on OverDrive

 

Finding Winnie:  The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear

Lindsay Mattick

Summary:

Before there was Winnie-the-Pooh, there was a real bear named Winnie.

In 1914, during World War I, Captain Harry Colebourn, a Canadian veterinarian on his way to serve with cavalry units in Europe, rescued a bear cub in White River, Ontario. He named the bear Winnie, after his hometown of Winnipeg, and he took the bear to war. Harry Colebourn’s real-life great-granddaughter Lindsay Mattick recounts their incredible journey, from a northern Canadian town to a convoy across the ocean to an army base in England . . . and finally to the London Zoo, where Winnie made a new friend: a boy named Christopher Robin. Gentle yet haunting illustrations by acclaimed illustrator Sophie Blackall bring the wartime era to life, and are complemented by photographs and ephemera from the Colebourn family archives. Here is the remarkable true story of the bear who inspired Winnie-the-Pooh.  — Goodreads.com

Find it on OverDrive

 

Daredevil:  The Daring Life of Betty Skelton

Megan Mccarthy

Summary:

In the 1930s most girls were happy playing with dolls. But one girl, Betty Skelton, liked playing with airplanes, watching them fly around outside, and even flying airplanes herself! She lived for an adventure—in the air, the water, and on land—and nothing could stop her, especially not being a girl.

When Betty Skelton was young there weren’t many women flying airplanes or racing cars, but she wouldn’t let that stop her. She was always ready to take on a challenge, and she loved to have fun. Beetty rode motorcycles, raced cars, jumped out of planes, and flew jets, helicoptors, gliders, and blimps. And by the time she was an adult, Betty was known in the press as the “First Lady of Firsts!”  — Goodreads.com

Find it on OverDrive

(Visited 5 times, 1 visits today)

Leave A Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *